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Over the past few years, the digital landscape has changed dramatically. Social media for estate agents is no longer an option but more of an imperative. Here are 4 BIG reasons why an estate agent should be using social media although they can apply to any business.

 

Social media doesn’t cost much

Social media, with its massive reach and huge audience, is the most effective way to promote your business online without investing a ton of money. Creating a profile is free and there are tools out there to help you manage all your profiles from one single dashboard so that helps take some of the stress away.

 

Developing an audience / following takes time but using the 75% / 25% approach – i.e. 75% of posts are about news / advice / help & support and then 25% are about you and your services – you should find it begins to grow.

 

Any paid promotions you decide to invest in, like Facebook Ads etc, are a relatively a low cost compared to other marketing expenses. The cost effective nature of social media enables you to see a much greater return on investment when compared to other marketing efforts.

 

Your customers are already on there

There were 2.80 billion global social media users in 2017, so many of your customers, clients, and future customers are already actively engaging on social media. It’s crucial as an estate agent that you engage and connect with your audience.

This is where social media can have a huge impact on your agency, giving you the opportunity to be in front of people who are relevant to your business and local area. Given the competitive nature of the property industry, social media is more important than ever in marketing your home to potential buyers or tenants.

 

Get in front of your competition

Although many agents use social media these days, it’s still surprising that a lot of companies are yet to get to grips with it properly. This is where you can turn it into your advantage; a lot of agencies neglect the engagement side of social media and solely put their efforts on advertising their properties. There is so much more to social media than just advertising your properties, by adding a human touch and engaging with your audience, your brand awareness will go through the roof.

 

Improves brand loyalty

A staggering 71% of consumers who have had a good social media experience with a brand are likely to recommend it to others. Reviews by followers can go a long way in improving your brand’s credibility, with people more inclined to contact you when looking to buy, sell or let a property.

 

Your followers can see what you are up to on a daily basis, giving you the opportunity to interact with them in real life and provide quick answers to their needs; this can go a long way in keeping potential customers satisfied.

By using social media, estate agencies can create more substantial, personal relationships with their clients while enhancing the visibility of their brand.

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The average price of a property coming onto the market in January 2018 is up by nearly £2,000 compared with December 2017, but sales are down by 5.5% from this time last year.

Rightmove, which tracks 90% of the UK property market, said there had been a “good start” to 2018, with more than 4 million visits a day to its site, up nearly a tenth on last year. The average price was up 0.7% to £297,587.

But sellers may be being hopeful in their pricing and may have to reduce the price to find buyers. Rightmove said the average time to sell a property has jumped to 67 days compared to 55 days last summer, which is an extra 12 days.

 

The period from now to late spring is traditionally the busiest time of the year for house hunters as they aim to complete transactions and then move during the summer school holidays and be settled in time for the Christmas holidays, but Rightmove said the pace of activity had slowed down.

Asking prices continue to fall in London. The average price for a home listed by the website in the capital is currently £600,926, down 1.4% on the month and 3.4% over the year.

With affordability stretched and incomes falling behind inflation, most property forecasters are predicting flat house prices in 2018 or relatively minor rises.

The two big lenders that operate well-known price indices, Nationwide said it is expected property values to be “broadly flat in 2018, with perhaps a marginal gain of around 1%”. Halifax has allowed itself some wiggle room, predicting UK growth from 0% to 3%.

Halifax said that in December house prices fell by 0.6%, the first decline it had registered in six months.

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Big plans this year? Do they include buying a house? Best of luck!

Our main advice is to do your research in due time and try to have a guideline before you start searching. You can actually start with these 5 things in mind:

  1. Give yourself enough time for research.
  2. Is it going to be your home forever-and-ever or just for a couple of years?
  3. Location is most important for you?
  4. Estimate correctly the buying time.
  5. What are the main responsibilities you are looking to?!

5 things to think about when you buy your first house

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Photo source: Wikimedia http://bit.ly/2EBN0JJ

[…] the growing appetite for flexible offices is permeating across European markets, with London, Berlin and Paris witnessing the strongest growth. The sector will continue to expand, as new styles of workspaces are developed to service a growing variety of occupier needs […]

Commercial property market in Europe starts 2018 on a positive note

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Photo source: Wikimedia http://bit.ly/2D7jGxK

Being energy efficient can make a big difference to the cost of your energy bill. It doesn’t always need a big investment in time or money to make sure you’re wasting less energy and saving more.

 

These are our top tips to help you save money on your energy bills:

Switch off or unplug any chargers or appliances you don’t need on.
If they have a stand-by light, a display or are hot to the touch they’ll be using energy just by being plugged in.

 

Washing at a lower temperature will use less electricity.

Washing at 30ºC rather than 40ºC can save you a third of the cost to run the cycle.

 

Insulating your home can save you money.

Loft insulation can save up to £140 a year off your energy bills and cavity wall insulation can save up to £160 a year.

 

Think ahead when setting your heating.

Set your heating to come on 15-30 minutes before you need it on, and off 30 minutes before you go to bed.

 

If you have storage heaters, make sure you’re using them efficiently.

Keep the input constant at the amount you need, but turn the output down to a minimum when you don’t need the heating on or turn it off at the wall.

 

Turn the pressure down on the power shower.

A high-pressure power shower is a great luxury to have but you’d be surprised how much water they use – sometimes even more than a bath.

 

Hang up your laundry.

Air-dry your laundry rather than tumble drying it, particularly if there’s warm or windy weather. What’s more nothing smells better than air-dried clothes.

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Photo source: Pixabay http://bit.ly/2qKmbRC

Kitchen design in 2018 is all about timber veneers, colour contrast, texture, metallic, and the ongoing industrial look,’ says bespoke furniture manufacturers Schmidt.

The tail end of 2017 has seen the emergence of more bold colours and textures in kitchen doors and this will follow into the New Year. The mix of striking solid colours and woodgrains will continue to prove popular, whilst more industrial finishes like concrete will sit alongside these to really create interest in the kitchen. Consumers are increasingly looking for more variety and being braver in their style and colour choices.’

 

  1. ‘Vibrant colour schemes will continue to be popular for 2018 with a focus on both Scandinavian application. The use of colour in the kitchen is extremely important and should reflect homeowners’ personalities and their needs. For instance, a space for cooking should be light and bright while spaces designed for entertaining could have a darker essence to provide a suitable ambience.’

 

  1. From Cobalt blue to powder blue and teal, blue is the colour of the MOMENT when it comes to kitchens. Darker shades of this versatile hue will prove to be the most popular. ‘Undoubtedly the biggest colour trend the industry has seen this year is the desire to have blue in the kitchen,’

 

  1. ‘Golds have been on trend for a while now but the move to combining them with browns and organic materials is going to be big for 2018,’ predicts Papilio. ‘Combining the use of neutrals, golds and organic textures makes for a warm environment with slight seventies feel, hitting the mark in terms of both style and substance. The Boho look is not only easily adaptable with other colours but also comes hand in hand with good quality and timeless design – something which a kitchen needs to present.’

 

  1. ‘Smart appliances are developing at a rapid pace and anyone considering installing a new kitchen in 2018 should really not do without a boiling water tap , being seen as a necessity in today’s living, wifi ready appliance that are allowing us to control our kitchens from afar, and steam ovens and vacuum drawers, this makes cooking quicker, easier and contains the flavour in the food,’ say Kitchens International.

 

  1. Feel like you’re on holiday all year around with a kitchen inspired by warmer climates. Pinterest data reveals that there has been a 128% rise in searches and saves for Moroccan-inspired décor, with ‘Moroccan tiles’ and ‘Moroccan splashbacks’ really gaining momentum. Mike Lavers agrees. ‘We predict that striking mosaic wallpaper and feature floor tiles will be hugely popular in 2018, along with other light Moroccan touches such as chunky wooden worktops, gold lanterns and pendant lighting.’
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1920s

At the end of the first world war, Britain was a nation in which almost 80% of people rented their homes, almost all from private landlords. Concern about the poor standards of the housing stock led the prime minister, David Lloyd George, to promise a “land fit for heroes” for the homecoming Tommies. The 1919 Housing Act provided subsidies for local authorities to build council houses.

1930s

House building peaked at 350,000 a year in the mid-1930s as a prolonged period of cheap money prompted a private-sector building boom. With land and labour plentiful, and official interest rates pegged at 2%, this was the era of the three-bedroom semi and the expansion of cities out into the suburbs. New industries – car plants, aerospace companies, engineering firms – accompanied the ribbon development along the major arterial roads.

1940s

The second world war caused a double whammy: German bombing inflicted widespread damage to urban areas while house building came to a halt. The Beveridge report identified “squalor” as one of the five “giants” blocking the road to progress, but with money tight and construction materials in short supply, the pick-up in activity was slow. Aneurin Bevan, jointly health and housing minister, insisted council homes be built to high standards.

1950s

Council-house building peaked under the Conservative government of the 1950s, when the end of rationing and a growing economy meant that 250,000 new local authority homes a year were being put up. Much of the expansion was in the new towns designated by the Attlee government in land beyond the newly created green belt surrounding London – towns such as Hemel Hempstead, Harlow and Crawley.

1960s

House price boom-busts were still a thing of the future in the 1960s, the decade that saw combined private and council house building hit a postwar peak of just over 400,000 a year. This was the era of the tower block, with quantity coming at the expense of quality. One block, Ronan Point in east London, collapsed in 1968 following a gas explosion. By the end of the 1960s, Britain had as many owner-occupiers as renters.

1970s

Britain had its first experience of a housing bubble during the so-called Barber boom of 1973. An easing of credit conditions by the Bank of England coupled with the go-for-growth strategy of the Conservative chancellor, Tony Barber, resulted in house-price inflation peaking at 36%. The average price of a home, which had risen from £2,000 to £5,000 between 1950 and 1970, doubled in the next three years. The boom ended when the Yom Kippur war and the Opec oil embargo ushered in the stagflation of the mid-1970s.

1980s

Offering council tenants the right to buy their own homes was suggested to Jim Callaghan at the end of the 1970s. He rejected the idea but it was pounced upon by Margaret Thatcher, who made it the centrepiece of her political pitch to the aspirational working classes. Those who took advantage of the offer quickly saw the value of their assets surge in Britain’s second big housing bubble – the Lawson boom. House prices rose by 16% in 1987 and a further 25% in 1988.

1990s

The bust that followed the Lawson boom was long and painful. Interest rates were raised to 15% and left there for a year to control inflation. Unemployment doubled to hit 3 million for the second time in a decade and many of those who had taken out big mortgages could no longer afford the repayments. Record numbers of people had their homes repossessed as house prices fell for four successive years. It was not until the end of the 1990s that the market started to recover.

2000s

A rising population. More than a decade and a half of steady economic growth. Ample supplies of cheap credit. A sharp fall in the number of homes being built. These were the ingredients that contributed to Britain’s third big housing bubble of the post-war period. The average house price more than doubled from £100,000 in 2000 to just under £225,000 in 2007, before the financial crash brought the boom to an end. House building fell during the recession to its lowest peacetime level since the early 1930s.

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Or where to spot the most stunning wildlife? Browse our places to see before you die and see how many you can tick off your bucket list…

Photo source: PublicDomainPictures http://bit.ly/2CqF8dq

Swim, snorkel and dive Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

Explore the living masterpiece that is the Great Barrier Reef by swimming, sailing, snorkelling and diving. The World Heritage-listed attraction stretches more than 2,000km along the Queensland coast and can be seen from outer space. Hop between the idyllic, palm-fringed islands and discover the bright coral and marine life. Visit Heron and Wilson islands during the annual turtle nesting season (November to March) where you can witness hatchlings scurrying to the sea.

 

Gaze at the Northern Lights from a glass igloo in Finnish Lapland

The Northern Lights are one of nature’s phenomenon’s that you need to see to believe. With easy access to the natural light display, snowy wilderness and reindeers, Finnish Lapland is a magical place to spot the Aurora Borealis. Instead of watching them outside in freezing temperatures, why not spot the lights from the comfort of your own heated glass igloo? It means you can spend the night gazing at the sky from your bed and wake up to the spectacular snow-covered scenery.

 

Marvel at mysterious Stonehenge

An unforgettable day out and one of Britain’s most wonderful attractions, Stonehenge is a highlight of the South West and probably the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. It comes with a mysterious history and was built around 5,000 years ago. Was it a temple for sun worship? A healing centre? A burial site? Or maybe a huge calendar? The World Heritage Site never fails to impress and is surrounded by prehistoric landscape, perfect for a walk in the beautiful Wiltshire countryside.

 

Take an outdoor bath in Budapest

Soak up the atmosphere of Budapest in the winter when the locals and tourists hit the city of baths’ outdoor thermal pools to keep warm, socialise and enjoy the healing waters. The Szechenyi has an enormous neo-Baroque courtyard with a bath and one of its best sights is the dedicated chess players with their floating cork boards! The Gellert is known as the finest of all the bath houses with its main indoor pool – perhaps the best example of Hungary’s neo-classical architecture. Rudas and Kiraly are other historic baths in the city.

 

Feel the freedom of an American road trip on Route 66

It’s inspired songwriters, novelists and filmmakers, and Route 66, the Mother Road of America makes for an epic journey across the States, stretching for 2,400 miles from Chicago, Illinois to Santa Monica, California. Route 66 crosses eight states: Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. Spend 16 days exploring the route and stopping at attractions, such as St Louis’s jazz clubs, Oklahoma City, the desert scenery of Santa Fe, the vast Grand Canyon and the Las Vegas Strip.

 

 

 

 

 

Scottish Highlands

The Highlands of Scotland are filled with some of the most incredible scenery in the world. Here, you’ll feel as if you’ve walked into a painting, with towering heather-covered mountains, picturesque lochs, cascading waterfalls and magnificent, ancient castles.

 

Take a dip in Iceland’s Blue Lagoon

Fed by naturally-heated and mineral-rich seawater, Iceland’s Blue Lagoon is the country’s most unique attraction, located 40 minutes from Reykjavik. The extraordinary pool is where you can take off your thermals and bathe in the water, reaping the benefits of the geothermal water. Be sure to smother yourself in the white silica mud and take your natural spa experience to the next level by sweating in the sauna with a view of the lagoon and standing underneath the waterfall for an energising massage. Bliss!

 

The Taj Mahal

The 17th century jewel in India’s crown has been attracting tourists and royalty alike for centuries. It was commissioned by the emperor as a tomb for his favourite wife, and that sense of lavish romance spills into the 21st century. Pose for a photo on that bench – made famous by Diana and recreated by William and Kate – and then explore Agra by bike. Sundown on the Yamuna will be an unforgettable end to the day.

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Welcome to 2018! Optimism tells us it is going to be a great and exuberant year, so be prepared!

Consider it a DIY project or your new home and make the best of it. As we know from the previous year already, anything can be changed and we tried to prove it with helping articles, tips& tricks, and a handful of useful advice.

Let us guide you through 2018 as well and enjoy the ride that will make you reconsider your perspectives about a home.

Photo source: Pinterest http://bit.ly/2qdJcfn

First things first, we trust a general guideline about the trends to follow in the year to come. Elle Decor made a list based on Pinterest searches and it features:

  1. Wall art
  2. Patterned plants
  3. Mixed metallics
  4. Terrazzo flooring
  5. Statement ceilings
  6. Spa-inspired bathrooms

You will find details and pictures in the article.

What have you been thinking about changing in your house this year?

 

Photo source: Pinterest http://bit.ly/2lJfYA6

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Photo source: Wikimedia http://bit.ly/2lhq4IC

Walthamstow, also known as ‘awesomestow’, is exactly that.

 

An earlier spelling of Walthamstow was ‘Wilcumstowe’ meaning ‘place of welcome.’ AEC was located in Walthamstow and was responsible for the mass production of London’s famous buses. The “mile long” Walthamstow Market began trading in 1885 and is one of the most iconic markets in the city. However, the legend of it being a mile long is a slight overestimation as in reality it measures in at 100 metres. Despite starting life as a rural area, it’s now largely a suburban, built up area. Head to Walthamstow Village for a little taster of what the area was originally like.

 

Walthamstow is very well served by Underground and Overground stations with stations for both at Walthamstow Central and Blackhorse Road. Full bus services operate from Walthamstow Central. The buses also provide a hopper service making all journeys simple and quick.

 

All you read is love was a pop-up café/coffee shop with a twist that has just found a permanent spot in Leytonstone (next to Walthamstow). The twist is that it is a book café run by Danish siblings on the beautiful Hoe Street. Serving up sandwiches, cakes, coffee and craft beers along with DJs and writing workshops at certain times.

Walthamstow Market

 

This historic market has been trading for well over a hundred years. It has a variety of stalls selling food, clothes, furniture, and antique goods while there are also cafes and restaurants selling anything from Caribbean food to jellied eels. It hosts a popular farmer’s market every Sunday between 10am and 2pm.

Address: Walthamstow Market can be found on Walthamstow High Street.

 

‘The Mall’ have a number of shopping centres all over the UK and are one of the leaders in this market. As well as hosting a number of events throughout the year, including craft markets on Sundays and children’s events this Halloween, the Mall has hundreds of shops under its roof. From household names to eateries, it’s well worth a visit for all the shopaholics out there!

Address: The Mall Walthamstow, 45 Selborne Walk, Walthamstow

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