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In recent years we have seen an increase in the construction of high-rise, with more high-rise buildings being constructed than at any other time.


Across the UK there are currently over 270 existing high-rise buildings and structures, of which around 70% are in London. There are just 17 high-rise buildings over 150m (492ft.) in height and just one building – The Shard in London – over 300m, and London itself is considered ‘low-rise’ for a global city and financial capital of the world.


However, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of high-rise buildings proposed and approved for construction in the UK. The UK development pipeline currently stands at around 500 buildings, of which over 85% are planned in London, while the rest are clustered in key cities such as Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester and Salford.


In terms of end-use sector, around 70% of high-rise buildings currently under construction or under consideration across the UK are primarily residential, but with an element of mixed-use, e.g. retail, community or leisure.


AMA Research has revealed that in London, the high-rise market is being driven by the private housing sector, especially at the top-end of the market, and recovery in demand for commercial property.


It suggests that the concept of high-rise living has changed and the majority of high-rise residential tower blocks in UK cities are now being developed as luxury accommodation, with a mixed-use element incorporating leisure facilities, concierge services, restaurants and retail.


Such a trend may not necessarily be good for the housing industry, as Hayley Thornley, research manager at AMA Research, explained: “Going forward, the high-rise construction market is set to continue to grow, with the ever-increasing demand for housing.

“However, there are concerns about too many projects aimed at the luxury end of the market, which is not matched with housing demand. In addition, the uncertainties surrounding Brexit may influence some high-rise schemes, with many projects in the pipeline forecast to exceed stated completion dates.”


The proportion of mixed-use schemes in the high-rise buildings pipeline is set to grow, with around 18% of developments either under construction or proposed with a mixed-use function. In the office market, rising take-up, low availability of grade-A space and increasing rents in cities such as Manchester, Bristol, Birmingham, Leeds and Edinburgh, is helping to boost output in the commercial office sector and has led to more speculative building.


Sustained growth in the private rented sector (PRS) is also driving the development of high-rise housing, with increasing financial backing from both domestic and foreign institutional investors. Student accommodation also forms a small, but significant proportion of high-rise building development with a number of schemes currently in planning.


Key factors affecting the development of high-rise buildings include cost, space efficiency, wind & seismic considerations, structural safety, risk challenges both on site and in completed buildings, speed of elevators, new building materials to potentially replace steel and concrete and damping systems. In addition, significant technical and logistical factors include pumping and placing concrete at extreme heights, and craning and lifting items to extreme heights.

The definition of high-rise buildings varies, but in this report AMA Research looks at UK regional and London developments of 15-20 storeys and above.

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UK is about to become a world leader for ‘for speed, simplicity and an open approach to data’, when it comes to real estate transactions. This is the goal the Land Registry set for 2018 and it should be reached once digitalization is in place – 6th of April 2018.

The process will become simpler, faster and cheaper while at the same time the integrity and security of the register against threats from cyber-attacks and digital fraud will be strengthened…

But what are the implications for those acting on the real estate market: sellers and buyers?!

Details in the article on Property Wire:

Buying and selling property moves into the digital age in the UK

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Photo source: http://bit.ly/2nartS9

Before buying a home, it’s essential to know whether it’s freehold or leasehold. It’s the difference between owning your property outright and having a landlord.


Owning a property freehold means you own the whole building and the land it stands on. Most houses – not ones divided into flats – are sold on this basis. When buying a freehold property, you are listed on the land register. You’re responsible for any and all costs incurred to maintain the fabric of the building, common parts and land.

While this might sound like a big responsibility, the benefit is that you won’t need to pay ground rent, service charges or management fees, and you’re able to modify the property to your tastes – seeking planning or building permission where required.


Leasehold means you effectively lease a property for a number of years. This is common for flats or apartments, and less common with houses. You will have bought and signed a lease agreement for the property from the freeholder, often referred to as the landlord.

When buying a leasehold, the more number of years on the lease, the better. Leases can last as long as 999 years! After this time, the lease reverts back to the freeholder. Avoid buying properties with 80 years or less left on the lease. Securing mortgages on these properties is difficult and you may have to shell out for expensive renewal fees if you wish to remain in the property after the lease has expired.

Leasehold limitations

You don’t own the property outright when you buy a leasehold. As a result, you may face restrictions and additional charges.

For example, you’ll need the freeholder’s permission to do certain things. This is known as requesting a ‘licence for alterations’. From asking to keep a pet, to seeking permission to knock walls through, actions you may need to ask the freeholder about can vary from property to property.

Ground rent and service fees apply, too. These annual fees are charged to the leaseholders for the maintenance of the building. Primarily, these fees are put towards building insurance, but also cover the upkeep of common areas, entrance ways, building security or roofing and structural repairs.

The only time this is not the case is if the leaseholders have been awarded the Right to Manage.

What is Right to Manage?

Unhappy with how the freeholder’s managing agents look after the property, or are spending the service charge funds? You could apply to take over certain building management duties from the freeholder. This is known as ‘The Right to Manage’ and is awarded by the First Tier Tribunal.

To gain Right to Manage responsibilities, multiple leaseholders need to apply collectively. For more information on qualifying for Right to Manage, visit the Leasehold Advisory Service.

Share of freehold

Should you choose to buy a leasehold property, in many cases you may be eligible to collectively purchase the freehold. ‘Collective enfranchisement’ is when a group of leasehold property owners act together to buy the freehold of the property. Owning the freehold is an attractive prospect, because you’ll have more freedom over your property. Sounds great, but the road to get there is complicated.

We strongly recommend researching the complexities of owning a share of the freehold, seeking legal advice before making your first move. Sites like gov.uk and lease-advice.org are great starting points.

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One of the most important rooms of a house is the kitchen. And it’s usually difficult to find a design that suits your style, is efficient, functional, and in the trends at the same time.

So if designing/ redesigning the kitchen is on your list for 2018, we made a list of articles you should check out before settling your mind on something.

9 Top Trends in Kitchen Design for 2018

9 Top Trends in Kitchen Design for 2018

They are saying that you should have on your shortlist of kitchen-must-have’s the following:

  • technology and gadgets;
  • white, elegant gray and dark shades as colours;
  • less upper cabinets;
  • quartz countertops;
  • clever storage space;
  • hardwood flooring or ceramic tiles;
  • single-level multipurpose kitchen islands;
  • … and, since everyone gets around the kitchen, please provide it with some pet-friendly spaces.

However, trends are not always about keeping it clean and neat. Sometimes they are bold and revolutionary… like these suggestions from Elle Decor:

Photo source: Elle Decor http://bit.ly/2DMUKvs

Photo source: Elle Decor http://bit.ly/2nartS9

And for all those wanting a kind, calm, and loving kitchen, just like your family, get some inspiration from this types of natural wood cabinets. They might be more in your trends than you think!

Natural Wood Kitchen Cabinets [GALLERY]

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House trends can be confusing if you are one of those addicts always wanting to ride the wave. And it’s usually not the trends themselves, but the terms specialist use to name small changes in style from one trend to another.

Photo source: hips.hearstapps.com http://bit.ly/2rA5o4b

We have ‘Scandinavian’ vs. ‘minimalism’ for example. When you see an image of two rooms that illustrate these two design concepts, you might be inclined to say there is no difference. Specialists beg to differ and that is because:

  • minimalism refers to open-spaces decorated with industrial materials and a lot of geometrical shapes;
  • while ‘Scandinavian’ means using natural materials and pale shades.

Moreover, the Scandinavian trend implies using minimalism items like these pieces of furniture we like! 🙂



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If 2018 came with some extra courage for you, we have some ideas on how to materialize it! Start a business in real estate for some extra monthly income and good use of your spare time. And there might be months when the money are just going to come, without any effort.

As any other business idea, becoming an entrepreneur in the real estate domain is tricky. Might not seem easy at first, but things are not very complicated. Just ‘do your homework’ in advance, as this article on Property Division says and you should be prepared.

Do Your Homework Before Investing in Real Estate

Feeling ready? We’re here if you have any questions and you can go to our website to search for types of properties that are worth investing in. 

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Photo source: Pexels.com http://bit.ly/2DksPiY

Over the past few years, the digital landscape has changed dramatically. Social media for estate agents is no longer an option but more of an imperative. Here are 4 BIG reasons why an estate agent should be using social media although they can apply to any business.


Social media doesn’t cost much

Social media, with its massive reach and huge audience, is the most effective way to promote your business online without investing a ton of money. Creating a profile is free and there are tools out there to help you manage all your profiles from one single dashboard so that helps take some of the stress away.


Developing an audience / following takes time but using the 75% / 25% approach – i.e. 75% of posts are about news / advice / help & support and then 25% are about you and your services – you should find it begins to grow.


Any paid promotions you decide to invest in, like Facebook Ads etc, are a relatively a low cost compared to other marketing expenses. The cost effective nature of social media enables you to see a much greater return on investment when compared to other marketing efforts.


Your customers are already on there

There were 2.80 billion global social media users in 2017, so many of your customers, clients, and future customers are already actively engaging on social media. It’s crucial as an estate agent that you engage and connect with your audience.

This is where social media can have a huge impact on your agency, giving you the opportunity to be in front of people who are relevant to your business and local area. Given the competitive nature of the property industry, social media is more important than ever in marketing your home to potential buyers or tenants.


Get in front of your competition

Although many agents use social media these days, it’s still surprising that a lot of companies are yet to get to grips with it properly. This is where you can turn it into your advantage; a lot of agencies neglect the engagement side of social media and solely put their efforts on advertising their properties. There is so much more to social media than just advertising your properties, by adding a human touch and engaging with your audience, your brand awareness will go through the roof.


Improves brand loyalty

A staggering 71% of consumers who have had a good social media experience with a brand are likely to recommend it to others. Reviews by followers can go a long way in improving your brand’s credibility, with people more inclined to contact you when looking to buy, sell or let a property.


Your followers can see what you are up to on a daily basis, giving you the opportunity to interact with them in real life and provide quick answers to their needs; this can go a long way in keeping potential customers satisfied.

By using social media, estate agencies can create more substantial, personal relationships with their clients while enhancing the visibility of their brand.

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The average price of a property coming onto the market in January 2018 is up by nearly £2,000 compared with December 2017, but sales are down by 5.5% from this time last year.

Rightmove, which tracks 90% of the UK property market, said there had been a “good start” to 2018, with more than 4 million visits a day to its site, up nearly a tenth on last year. The average price was up 0.7% to £297,587.

But sellers may be being hopeful in their pricing and may have to reduce the price to find buyers. Rightmove said the average time to sell a property has jumped to 67 days compared to 55 days last summer, which is an extra 12 days.


The period from now to late spring is traditionally the busiest time of the year for house hunters as they aim to complete transactions and then move during the summer school holidays and be settled in time for the Christmas holidays, but Rightmove said the pace of activity had slowed down.

Asking prices continue to fall in London. The average price for a home listed by the website in the capital is currently £600,926, down 1.4% on the month and 3.4% over the year.

With affordability stretched and incomes falling behind inflation, most property forecasters are predicting flat house prices in 2018 or relatively minor rises.

The two big lenders that operate well-known price indices, Nationwide said it is expected property values to be “broadly flat in 2018, with perhaps a marginal gain of around 1%”. Halifax has allowed itself some wiggle room, predicting UK growth from 0% to 3%.

Halifax said that in December house prices fell by 0.6%, the first decline it had registered in six months.

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