Photo source: Pixabay

February ended with a rise in property prices, as the data reveals. We were interested in finding out which of the regions were best seen by buyers…

From the prices table, we can see the leaders that peaked the charts:

North West

East Midlands

South West


South East and London have had prices raise by 2.5%, as this article on Property Reporter states.

It leaves the average value of a home in England & Wales at £299,556, up £1,512 compared to one month earlier, and £1,700 compared to a year ago.

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Anybody in contact with the real estate market in the UK might have noticed until now that the housing crisis. The main issue is the huge gap between supply and demand, but specialists argue that there is more than meets the eye.

However, politicians have stepped in and initiated a couple of measurements that are supposed to increase supply on the market by creating new homes in the future years.

The government’s policy was clearly outlined today during Theresa May’s speech and the main target points seem to be:

  • The creation of up to FIVE New Towns between Oxford and Cambridge to create the UK’s own ‘Silicon Corridor’, an apparent ‘Brain Belt’.
  • Supporting transport infrastructure including an expressway and enhanced rail services between the two cities.
  • The removal of decision making from local councils that continually fail to build adequate homes with the introduction of minimum housing targets for each area and a tough enforcement approach based on the delivery of those homes.
  • A focus on providing geo-targeted ‘affordable’ housing for key workers where there is a shortage of such stock.
  • Continued Green Belt protection.
  • An encouragement for developers to ‘build upwards’ in cities.
  • A ‘use it or lose it’ policy on land owned by developers with planning permission.

All of the above are detailed and commented in a very good summed-up article on Property Reporter.

It seems promising… now let’s hope for the best! And, moreover, let’s hope these measures will suffice for the refreshment of the real estate market.

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This is the ultimate way to get all the insights after a first impression! Guests will know exactly what type of personality the homeowner is judging only by the… book’s cover a.k.a. the front door.

Photo source: Pixabay

Black: elegant, powerful, and prestigious

White: simple, crisp, and pristine

Gray: timeless and classic

Navy: authoritative and trustworthy

Green: calm, quiet, and soothing

Red: commanding, dynamic, and engaging

Purple: dramatic

Yellow: warm, welcoming, and optimistic

Pink Lavender: youthful and spirited

Natural stain: rustic and comforting


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UK landlords face more pressure with costs rising over the last few months. Latest studies show that the market is almost at half the average in UK.

Number of homes for rent in London is 46% below the national average

The buy-to-let is one area in which landlords feel the high pressure, since the costs here have been continuously rising.

Each side of the coin is equally affected: the landlords and the tenants that are swimming in a cold market.

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Photo source: Wikimedia

Working in London and living in the countryside? Maybe you’re one of those who are willing to spend some time on the road just to enjoy the quiet landscapes of areas outside London like Windsor, Surrey Hills, Colne Valley, Epping Forest, Lullingstone Country Park, St Albans or Brentwood?

Top 7 places to escape to and find your dream home

These would be our recommendations, too. What would you suggest we add on the list?

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Photo source: CityIQ

The need for new residential buildings is obvious in a big city like London. However, space for new homes can be an issue, even when the Government actually decides to give funds for development.

A recent report states that in London are 18 hotspots when it comes to counting residential developments.

In terms of values, the majority are localities where new build developments are priced at under £800 per square foot most are also outside zone 1.

These hotspots range from Southall in the West of London to Tottenham Hale in the North and West Ham in the East. They all have one thing in common: their future and raise of prices depends heavily on the infrastructure updates London already happening all across town.

Report identities new build development hotspots in London

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You’ve found the home of your dreams, but it’s listed. Should this put you off, or is it nothing to worry about?

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Here are five things you need to know about buying a listed property


  1. Your property will be on a national register

Listed buildings are on a national register of properties which are of architectural or historical interest. There are around 500,000 listed buildings in the UK. There are three distinct types of listing:


Grade I: This means the property is of ‘exceptional interest’. Only around 2.5% of listed buildings are Grade 1 listed.

Grade II*: This means the property is important and considered of more than special interest. Around 5.5% of listed buildings fall into this category.

Grade II: This means the building is of special interest. The clear majority of listed buildings, around 92%, fall into this category.


All buildings constructed before 1700 are listed, as are the majority of those built between 1700 and 1840. Some modern buildings are listed too if they are considered of special importance, such as the Royal Festival Hall and the BT Tower in London. You can find out if a property is listed by searching for it on the National Heritage List for England.


  1. You’ll need specialist permission to make changes

If you want to make changes to a listed property, such as building an extension or changing the internal layout, you will have to apply for listed building consent. It can be more difficult to get this consent, as conservation officers need to take the property’s historical significance into consideration. If planning permission is granted, you may need to use specialist materials or techniques so that you don’t alter the character of the property.

If you’re considering buying a listed property, you must check that any work that’s been done in the past had planning permission. If it hasn’t, then you rather than the previous owner will be responsible for putting things back to how they were.


  1. Repairs may cost more

You’ll often have to hire tradesmen with specialist skills and products to make repairs to a listed property, which can be far more expensive than using a ‘standard’ builder. Do plenty of research before buying and make sure you get a comprehensive survey, so you get an idea of the sort of work that might need doing.

  1. You may be able to get a grant for repairs to a listed property

Historic England, which is the public body that looks after England’s historic environment, occasionally offers grants to owners of historic buildings if they need repair. They are usually offered in situations where, without a grant, a project would not be able to go ahead. You can find out more about some of the grants which might be available and how to apply for them at



  1. You may need specialist home insurance

When taking out home insurance, you must let your insurer know if the property is listed. Depending on the type of property you are buying, you may need specialist cover, although some mainstream insurers will cover listed buildings.

Remember too that your buildings cover should be for the rebuild cost of the property and not its market value. Listed buildings often have higher rebuild costs than other properties because they may require specialist materials. This means cover can be more expensive than if you are buying a home that isn’t listed. Never scrimp on cover – if you are underinsured, this could cause serious financial problems if you need to make a claim.


No question that a listed building potentially presents more problems than a new home, but owners of listed properties say it’s the same as owning a vintage car. It may need more servicing but every time you look at it, you feel a little surge of pride and pleasure!

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Photo source: Wikimedia

In recent years we have seen an increase in the construction of high-rise, with more high-rise buildings being constructed than at any other time.


Across the UK there are currently over 270 existing high-rise buildings and structures, of which around 70% are in London. There are just 17 high-rise buildings over 150m (492ft.) in height and just one building – The Shard in London – over 300m, and London itself is considered ‘low-rise’ for a global city and financial capital of the world.


However, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of high-rise buildings proposed and approved for construction in the UK. The UK development pipeline currently stands at around 500 buildings, of which over 85% are planned in London, while the rest are clustered in key cities such as Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester and Salford.


In terms of end-use sector, around 70% of high-rise buildings currently under construction or under consideration across the UK are primarily residential, but with an element of mixed-use, e.g. retail, community or leisure.


AMA Research has revealed that in London, the high-rise market is being driven by the private housing sector, especially at the top-end of the market, and recovery in demand for commercial property.


It suggests that the concept of high-rise living has changed and the majority of high-rise residential tower blocks in UK cities are now being developed as luxury accommodation, with a mixed-use element incorporating leisure facilities, concierge services, restaurants and retail.


Such a trend may not necessarily be good for the housing industry, as Hayley Thornley, research manager at AMA Research, explained: “Going forward, the high-rise construction market is set to continue to grow, with the ever-increasing demand for housing.

“However, there are concerns about too many projects aimed at the luxury end of the market, which is not matched with housing demand. In addition, the uncertainties surrounding Brexit may influence some high-rise schemes, with many projects in the pipeline forecast to exceed stated completion dates.”


The proportion of mixed-use schemes in the high-rise buildings pipeline is set to grow, with around 18% of developments either under construction or proposed with a mixed-use function. In the office market, rising take-up, low availability of grade-A space and increasing rents in cities such as Manchester, Bristol, Birmingham, Leeds and Edinburgh, is helping to boost output in the commercial office sector and has led to more speculative building.


Sustained growth in the private rented sector (PRS) is also driving the development of high-rise housing, with increasing financial backing from both domestic and foreign institutional investors. Student accommodation also forms a small, but significant proportion of high-rise building development with a number of schemes currently in planning.


Key factors affecting the development of high-rise buildings include cost, space efficiency, wind & seismic considerations, structural safety, risk challenges both on site and in completed buildings, speed of elevators, new building materials to potentially replace steel and concrete and damping systems. In addition, significant technical and logistical factors include pumping and placing concrete at extreme heights, and craning and lifting items to extreme heights.

The definition of high-rise buildings varies, but in this report AMA Research looks at UK regional and London developments of 15-20 storeys and above.

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Before buying a home, it’s essential to know whether it’s freehold or leasehold. It’s the difference between owning your property outright and having a landlord.


Owning a property freehold means you own the whole building and the land it stands on. Most houses – not ones divided into flats – are sold on this basis. When buying a freehold property, you are listed on the land register. You’re responsible for any and all costs incurred to maintain the fabric of the building, common parts and land.

While this might sound like a big responsibility, the benefit is that you won’t need to pay ground rent, service charges or management fees, and you’re able to modify the property to your tastes – seeking planning or building permission where required.


Leasehold means you effectively lease a property for a number of years. This is common for flats or apartments, and less common with houses. You will have bought and signed a lease agreement for the property from the freeholder, often referred to as the landlord.

When buying a leasehold, the more number of years on the lease, the better. Leases can last as long as 999 years! After this time, the lease reverts back to the freeholder. Avoid buying properties with 80 years or less left on the lease. Securing mortgages on these properties is difficult and you may have to shell out for expensive renewal fees if you wish to remain in the property after the lease has expired.

Leasehold limitations

You don’t own the property outright when you buy a leasehold. As a result, you may face restrictions and additional charges.

For example, you’ll need the freeholder’s permission to do certain things. This is known as requesting a ‘licence for alterations’. From asking to keep a pet, to seeking permission to knock walls through, actions you may need to ask the freeholder about can vary from property to property.

Ground rent and service fees apply, too. These annual fees are charged to the leaseholders for the maintenance of the building. Primarily, these fees are put towards building insurance, but also cover the upkeep of common areas, entrance ways, building security or roofing and structural repairs.

The only time this is not the case is if the leaseholders have been awarded the Right to Manage.

What is Right to Manage?

Unhappy with how the freeholder’s managing agents look after the property, or are spending the service charge funds? You could apply to take over certain building management duties from the freeholder. This is known as ‘The Right to Manage’ and is awarded by the First Tier Tribunal.

To gain Right to Manage responsibilities, multiple leaseholders need to apply collectively. For more information on qualifying for Right to Manage, visit the Leasehold Advisory Service.

Share of freehold

Should you choose to buy a leasehold property, in many cases you may be eligible to collectively purchase the freehold. ‘Collective enfranchisement’ is when a group of leasehold property owners act together to buy the freehold of the property. Owning the freehold is an attractive prospect, because you’ll have more freedom over your property. Sounds great, but the road to get there is complicated.

We strongly recommend researching the complexities of owning a share of the freehold, seeking legal advice before making your first move. Sites like and are great starting points.

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